The Little Mermaid (Idea)

Sci-fi version of “Little Mermaid” where Ariel is a genetically engineered mermaid who is part of a top secret military program (Atlantica). She is capable of sinking submarines and ships with a powerful sonar she is able to create with her underwater voice. She is ordered to sink a fishing vessel (mistakenly thought to be a foreign military vessel) in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Los Angeles. She saves the Captain (Eric) but becomes depressed about her situation of destruction and lack of legs. Of course, she’s smitten by Eric and wants to be with him on land.

Eric’s father happens to be the Admiral who has Project Atlantica under his budget. Once he hears of the incident, he decides to shut it down. The program director (Dr. Triton) is told of the news to shutdown the program and is ordered to euthanize all of the creatures in the program. Of course, he has to keep it a secret, but the AI running the facility (Underwater Research System – Los Angeles) discovers the plan and uses Ariel’s love of Eric to coerce her into becoming a bipedal land dweller.

URSLA sends an AI lobster bot (Sebatian) to make arrangements with Ariel to become bipedal. URSLA fabricates some bionic legs to allow Ariel to see the world through a bipedal experience. Of course, Ariel must do a favor within 72 hours for the URSLA AI by plugging in a blue and yellow device (Flounder) to the USB port of an specific computer (Admiral who is shutting down Atlantica/Eric’s father).

Since Ariel is an underwater creature, she cannot vocally communicate outside of water, and there is not enough time to create a vocal communicator for her. The AI hides her from Dr. Triton but doesn’t let on that it knows Dr. Triton is euthanizing all the creatures and allows them to be systematically killed, including others just like Ariel.

Meanwhile, Ariel gets Eric to fall in love with her via online dating apps and virtual reality, masking her lack of voice. She gets to meet Eric’s father after Eric invites her to have dinner at the Admiral’s house. There she discovers that the URSLA program is slated to be shutdown by Eric’s father because of the incident where Ariel sank Eric’s ship, killing everyone aboard. This is only after she has already plugged in the device to the USB port.

The URSLA AI spreads to a nuclear submarine and begins to move the submarine into the Pacific to initiate global nuclear war. The only one who can stop it is Ariel, but since she no longer has fins, Eric must take her in an old ship, under heavy weather, and drop her into the ocean where she can destroy the submarine. She will have no way to make it back to the surface without fins, but it’s the only way to save Eric and humanity!

Human Machinery

A great example of the human machine is waking up in a particular “emotional state”: sad, angry, lonely, depressed, happy. That’s a product of the human machine. We have done nothing with the body or placed the body in an environment that makes such an emotional state a natural reaction. Yet, the emotional state is quite real.

That emotional state exists because the human body is a machine.

The moment we discover human machinery for ourselves brings clarity. Emotional states do not stop appearing (seemingly out of nowhere). Emotional states are not invalidated. If anything, discovering human machinery validates emotional states. An emotional state is created (whether physically/mentally awake or asleep) by human machinery.

We cannot NOT experience an emotional state. Still, an emotional state is both as real as our human body and as unreal as our dreams.

Prolonged exposure to particular emotional states (whether from a physical environment or a mental environment) results in reprogramming of the human machine. It is the same as learning to play the piano, ride a bicycle, drive a car, read, write, dance, do math, cook, sing, act, etc. Human machines can become programmed to produce a consistent emotional way of being. These exist as depression, anxiety, paranoia, delusion, and other ways of being that are often mistaken as an emotional state. The human machine has no judgement as to whether these are “good” or “bad”. That judgement is left to us.

The human machine becomes increasingly proficient at whatever it is trained to do. The human body will become better at being depressed (anxious, worried, happy) with practice whether you are choosing the training or not. Eventually, the human machine will be programmed to produce emotional states without thought. It is at that point, the human machine has gone from an emotional state to a way of being (e.g. going from “feeling depressed” to “being depressed”).

The state of depression is not the same as the emotion of feeling depressed. Depression is a physical state of being for the human machine. In any given moment, a human machine with depression can no more be NOT depressed than a human machine can not go to the bathroom. Depression is something the depressed human machine must do.

Seeing the distinction of our human machine gives us the opportunity to distinguish between taking an emotional laxative or costive.

  • If we choose to be purely our human machine, we are depressed
  • If we choose to be naive enough to believe that we are NOT our human machine, our human machine is still depressed
  • If we choose to exist inside of a human machine that is depressed, we are ourselves with a programmable human machine that can be reprogrammed to any way of being given prolonged training

In other words, we can choose to be in our depressed human machine AND train it to learn how to be in a perpetual state of happiness (or complacency or anything we want). Much like becoming a master at playing the piano takes 10,000 hours of practice, so does becoming a master at being happy. The great news is that any mental state can be practiced 24/7. That mental state has an effect on our human machine. We get to direct our human machine however we want.